Attention Registered Nurses

Important Patient Safety Information! Please Read and Share!

Eventually it will work its way into the cont. ed. requirements for clinicians but for now it’s very important that you read this information. It could save your patient and most importantly yourself a lot of unnecessary aggravation.

The inspiration for this is the man you see above, Shaun Arntsen. who was recently admitted to hospital after complaining of feeling unwell, bloating, and abdominal pain. His white cell count was 19,000 and he was taken to the OR on an emergency basis, where a laparotomy was performed and his very septic appendix removed.

At the time of this writing he remains admitted to medicine and is receiving IV antibiotics. Okay, so far there doesn’t seem to be anything worth mentioning here, but there actually is. You see, Shaun also has an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI), and unless he were to tell you himself, you likely wouldn’t know he had one. This particular ABI won’t appear anywhere on his chart or in his medical history.

Chronic quinoline encephalopathy

The term “quinism” may seem new, but the symptoms of poisoning by mefloquine (previously marketed as Lariam®), tafenoquine (marketed as Krintafel® and Arakoda™), and related quinoline drugs are all too familiar: Tinnitus. Dizziness. Vertigo. Paresthesias. Visual disturbances. Gastroesophageal and intestinal problems. Nightmares. Insomnia. Sleep apnea. Anxiety. Agoraphobia. Paranoia. Cognitive dysfunction. Depression. Personality change. Suicidal thoughts.
These symptoms are not “side effects”. They are symptoms of poisoning by a class of drug that is neurotoxic and that injures the brain and brainstem. This poisoning causes a disease, and this disease has a name: Chronic quinoline encephalopathy — also known as quinism.

https://quinism.org/

Shaun is a veteran of the war in Afghanistan, among the first battlegroup of Canadians in the country. While he was deployed he was ordered to take the anti-malarial drug mefloquine (Lariam) and subsequently developed chronic quinoline encephalopathy, also called mefloquine toxicity, or quinism.

Like thousands of others he was incorrectly diagnosed with PTSD, however it must be noted that it does share a number of symptoms with mefloquine toxicity. Anxiety, depression, nightmares, restlessness, and confusion are among the symptoms shared between PTSD and mefloquine toxicity.

PTSD vs. chronic quinoline encephalopathy

I’m going to rely on cut and paste in certain sections, if for no other reason than for accuracy. As medical professionals, you as nurses should be able to understand this just fime.


Intoxication with the antimalarial drug mefloquine (previously marketed as Lariam) is a potentially life-threatening condition marked by changes in affect, behavior, cognition, and thought that may be associated with a risk of central nervous system (CNS) neuronal injury as well as chronic neurological and psychiatric sequelae. The acute symptoms of mefloquine intoxication may mimic and be mistaken for a number of acute psychiatric disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Particularly in deployed settings, this may delay the correct diagnosis of mefloquine intoxication, risking subsequent morbidity. As the subacute and chronic psychiatric and neurologic sequelae of acute mefloquine intoxication may also confound the later diagnosis and management of PTSD, as well as other chronic neuropsychiatric disorders prevalent among deployed cohorts, health-care providers must screen for prior mefloquine exposure and consider the diagnosis of mefloquine intoxication in patients with appropriate history and findings on clinical evaluation.


To avoid missed diagnosis, mefloquine intoxication or its prodrome must be considered in any psychiatric differential diagnosis where mefloquine exposure is a possibility. As no available biomarkers, imaging, or objective testing modality has sufficient sensitivity to identify mefloquine intoxication in every setting, clinicians must be prepared to rely on details of history, clinical presentation, and the ruling out of other similar disorders for diagnosis.


Accumulated experience suggests that where the presentation of mefloquine intoxication is not fulminant as in this case, intoxication may begin with a subtle prodrome that may present with a sense of unease [10] or impending doom and restlessness [1112], personality change [10], agoraphobia [13], or other phobias [14]. Prodromal symptoms of intoxication may also include vivid dreams [15], nightmares [15], or sleep disturbances [16], including hypersomnia and often-severe insomnia [17]. Such symptoms may not be easily recognized, or may be misattributed to other causes including common stressors [18].


Over time these prodromal symptoms may progress to a more acute intoxication. Commonly reported symptoms of acute mefloquine intoxication include anxiety [19], paranoia [19] and persecutory mania [2021222324], panic attacks [252627], emotional lability [12], and aggression [28]. Patients may also experience symptoms of psychosis [29] including magical thinking [30] and grandiose [31], persecutory [32] or religious [1733] thoughts and delusions, and auditory [10203334], visual [1519343536], and olfactory [37] hallucinations, although as with the case, not infrequently with some degree of preserved insight.


With implicit memory typically preserved [48], those affected by explicit memory impairment from mefloquine intoxication may nonetheless be able to continue to participate in complex learned actions [49]. In certain cases, patients may even demonstrate improved performance during certain rote tasks [50], but may later experience profound amnesia to their actions or to events occurring during their period of intoxication [48]. Symptoms of memory impairment may also limit the reliability and completeness of reporting of prodromal symptoms preceding acute intoxication, or limit the reliability of history on initial examination [36].


Rather than reflecting a purely psychiatric disorder triggered or unmasked by the drug, these symptoms of mefloquine intoxication and its prodrome should be considered as organic manifestations of an underlying progressive toxic encephalopathy affecting particularly the limbic system and brainstem [10]. While potentially acutely reversible, this encephalopathy may be associated with a risk of chronic psychiatric effects [3055] as well as additional neurological effects likely due to central nervous system (CNS) injury [4].


These neurological effects most typically include dizziness, vertigo, and nystagmus, but not uncommonly also include sleep disorders, photophobia, accommodative disorders, dysesthesias, paresthesias, and occasionally myoclonus or dyskinesias, dysarthrias, dysautonomias, central apnea, and esophageal and gastrointestinal dysmotility, many of which have been observed from brainstem toxicity in closely related quinoline-based drugs [4].

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Related Diseases in Combat Veterans pp 257-278| 
The Mefloquine Intoxication Syndrome: A Significant Potential Confounder in the Diagnosis and Management of PTSD and Other Chronic Deployment-Related Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Remington Lee Nevin
Elspeth Cameron Ritchie

Early stages of acceptance

In World War I soldiers on both sides by the thousands were diagnosed with “shell shock” and by World War II it would be “battle fatigue”, many of whom would be labelled as cowards or goldbricks. It would take decades before what we know as PTSD would become an accepted diagnosis.

For mefloquine toxicity, these are its days of shell shock and battle fatigue, still not fully accepted by the medical community and greeted with scepticism. In many cases, the clinicians that have the most patient contact are nurses, and as such you get to know the patients and what is going on with them.

I only ask that you keep these things in mind, especially if your patient is a veteran. You don’t have to change the world, but you can save some lives by spreading some awareness, and educating others so that they can do the same.

You may have patients who feel completely alone and are ready to give up, but an angel of mercy can turn that around. Nurses play a very influential role in the medical profession, and the people suffering from this disease need you to advocate for them.

In closing, I want to thank each and every one of you for the work that you do. Overworked, unappreciated, and underpaid, the place really would fall apart without you.

D.B.

Link to The Quinism Foundation:

https://quinism.org/

A serious nightmare: psychiatric and neurologic adverse reactions to mefloquine are serious adverse reactions

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5684859/

So, You Have A Brain Injury And Your Appendix Explodes

Now what?

Hopefully you will have found your way to the emergency room and surgeons were able to remove your inflamed appendix before peritonitis set in (if you haven’t made it to the hospital by now you’ve likely died a painful, unpleasant death).

Fortunately for Shaun Arntsen, he made it to the hospital in time but he’s still pretty sick, so he’ll be there for a few days resting and taking in IV antibiotics. Ever the soldier, he continued to send updates as he was waiting for surgery and is still doing so now from his hospital bed.

It was in one of his updates that he brought up a very good point, and it’s one that is worth sharing. What happens when you have a brain injury and you end up in the hospital? It can be difficult being a patient with a brain injury, particularly if you have quinism.

For starters, brain injuries aren’t always readily apparent. You could be sitting next to someone with a brain injury, perhaps even talking with them, and you would never know that they had a brain injury.

The next issue presents itself because Shaun’s particular brain injury isn’t widely known about yet. Relatively speaking, chronic quinoline encephalopathy (aka quinism), is a new discovery and is still in the early stages of introduction to medicine. This highlights the need for education and awareness efforts aimed towards clinical medical professionals including physicians and pharmacists.

It’s an adjustment

For many people with brain injuries, routines are important. These routines help provide a sense of order in an otherwise disordered view of the world, and when these routines are broken, it can be very distressing and frustration can begin to build up.

Nutrition is another key aspect in the overall well-being of someone with a brain injury, especially for those with quinism, and any change in diet can also lead to difficulties for the patient.

Dave Bona Talks Super High Strength Probiotics and Brain Stem Injury

Chronic quinoline encephalopathy

…compelling evidence that the adverse health effects of mefloquine, tafenoquine, and related quinolines are not mere ‘side effects’, but symptoms of a disease called neuropsychiatric quinism caused by poisoning of the brain and brainstem by these drugs. The signs and symptoms of quinism reflect the localization of known neurotoxic injury of drugs of this class.”

Dr. Remington Nevin, Director, Quinism Foundation
https://quinism.org/press-releases/the-quinism-foundation-will-address-a-committee-of-the-national-academies-investigating-the-long-term-adverse-health-effects-of-mefloquine-among-veterans/

There are two kinds of brain injury, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and acquired brain injury (ABI). A TBI is the result of physical trauma to the brain, usually because of a severe concussive force placed upon it. Sometimes severe TBI’s are apparent through the manifestation of a variety of symptoms, such as aphasia, or, speech difficulties.


Acquired Brain Injury(ABI) refers to any damage to the brain that occurs after birth and is not related to a congenital or a degenerative disease. Causes include traumatic injury, seizures, tumors, events where the brain has been deprived of oxygen, infectious diseases, and toxic exposure such as substance abuse.

https://www.braininjurycanada.ca/acquired-brain-injury/

People suffering from chronic quinoline encephalopathy were exposed to a neurotoxic substance when they took mefloquine (Lariam), and for some the damage was done after taking only a single dose of the drug.

The strong temporal association reported in this case between the use of mefloquine and the onset of anxiety, paranoia, psychosis, dissociation and short-term memory impairment, accompanied by chronic disequilibrium and vertigo, is consistent with the development of a progressive limbic encephalopathy and an associated, likely multifocal brainstem injury caused by exposure to the drug. This case provides insights into the clinical significance of evidence in the neuroscience literature of brainstem neurotoxicity, limbic gap junction blockade, and GABAergic interneuron dysfunction attributable to mefloquine, and demonstrated in recent animal model studies.

This case suggests that careful testing of brainstem function may provide an objective method for evaluating subjective complaints of neuropsychiatric or physical adverse reactions attributed by patients to their use of mefloquine, particularly when these seem aphysiologic or significantly out of proportion to results of initial examination. Given the possibility of multifocal and typically microscopic brainstem lesions demonstrated due to quinoline neurotoxicity and the inherent difficulty in the diagnosis of such lesions, referral to ENT and neuro-optometric specialists and others with experience with central injury may be appropriate. This may be particularly true for patients with exposure to mefloquine who present reporting chronic disequilibrium or vertigo, who present with atypical neurologic findings, or among whom a diagnosis of ill-defined, personality, malingering, factitious, somatization or conversion disorder is being considered.

Limbic encephalopathy and central vestibulopathy caused by mefloquine: A case report*
Remington L. Nevin* Department of Preventive Medicine, Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital, 1585 Third Street, Fort Polk, LA 71459, USA Received 15 November 2011; received in revised form 21 February 2012; accepted 21 March 2012 Available online 9 April 2012

In most instances people with quinism are incorrectly diagnosed with PTSD. There are two explainations for this. First, many people with mefloquine toxicity will also have concomitant PTSD. Because many of those taking mefloquine are in the military and potentially performing high-risk duty, a diagnosis of PTSD would not be unreasonable.

Secondly, PTSD and mefloquine toxicity share a number of the same symptoms. Depression, insomnia, nightmares, rages, among a number of others could be symptomatic of either one. There are however a set of symptoms that occur with mefloquine toxicity that do not with PTSD.

This is because there has been damage to the brain stem and vestibular system. This accounts for symptoms like vertigo, tinnitus, headaches, and personality changes that are also seen in every instance of mefloquine toxicity.

  • Table 1 Pertinent history, symptoms, and clinical findings.
  • History
    • No prior head injury
    • No prior mental illness
    • No prior psychotropic drug use
  • Symptoms
    • Anxiety and paranoia
    • Auditory hallucinations
    • Disequilibrium
    • Derealization
    • Depersonalization
    • Headache
    • Palpitations
    • Personality change
    • Short-term memory impairment
    • Sleep disturbance
    • Spatial disorientation
    • Suicidal ideation
    • Tinnitus
    • Vertigo
  • Clinical findings
    • Aphysiologic pattern on computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) with falls on sensory organization tests (SOT) 5 and 6
    • Downbeat nystagmus
    • Normal brain computerized tomography (CT)
    • Normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (except for 3.9 mm plate-like area of “lesser enhancement” within the right anterior pituitary)
    • Normal endocrine labs (except for slightly low morning cortisol, with normal cosyntropin test)
    • Normal liver function tests (except for low alanine aminotransferase)

Limbic encephalopathy and central vestibulopathy P.147

The importance of communication.

The importance of communicating with your nurses cannot be overemphasized. They likely don’t know about your condition to begin with, and in Shaun’s case, weren’t aware that the condition existed. Try to be patient with them, no pun intended.

If you have brain injury things in your life can be stressful enough to begin with, but throw in the added stresses that a hopital stay can add, and your life can get downright miserable. But it doesn’t have to be.

Remember to breathe, and bring yourself into the moment. Be calm and communicative. The doctors and nurses are there to help you but you have to help them to. Tell them what’s going on with you, and it will make your life a little bit easier at a time when you’ll need it to be as easy as it can possibly get.

In the mean time, get better.

D.B.

Internet Exclusive. Causes of Action: The Facts of the Case Against The Government

The shocking and incredible elements of the case against the government.

Lawyers filed statements of claim in federal court in Toronto yesterday on behalf of eight Canadian veterans who are suing the federal government. Details of the suit were made available Wednesday night and,in an internet exclusive, I am publishing the details of the suit as described in the statements of claim.

The plaintiffs have presented a number of factual elements which they intend to prove in court, that will show that the government committed the following:

  1. Negligence
  2. Negligent Misrepresentation
  3. Breach of Fiduciary Duty
  4. Breach of the plaintiffs Section 7 Charter rights
  5. Battery
  6. Wilful Concealment
  7. Affected defendants mental and psychological state
  8. Misdiagnosis

Were the defendant in this case an individual or a corporation, it’s highly likely that they would also be facing criminal charges in Court of Queen’s Bench. But this is the government, and the only punishment available to them comes in the financial form. This means that the taxpayer is ultimately on the hook to serve the sentence whenever the government commits a crime.

What this is meant to do is to teach the government a lesson, that flouting the law comes at a price. It will then be up to voters to decide if the government deserves clemency or the death penalty, metaphorically of course.

Some of what is contained here could be upsetting. It is unfathomable that any government would treat its soldiers the way these defendants were treated, but yet it happened. It must be held accountable for these actions so that it never happens again.

CAUSES OF ACTION

65. Pursuant to s. 3 of the Crown Liability and Proceedings Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. C-50, the Defendant is directly and vicariously liable for any wrongs committed by DND, CAF or any of its employees and agents.

Negligence

The Government owed a duty of care to CAF Members. The Government knew or ought to have known that if it carried out its duties negligently, it could reasonably cause the kind of harm that was in fact suffered by the Plaintiffs.

The Government was required to:

a. use reasonable care to ensure the safety and well-being of the Plaintiffs;

b. obtain the införmed consent of the Plaintiffs before requiring them to take Mefloquine; and

c. use reasonable care in the operation, administration, prescribing, dispensing, managing, supervising, and monitoring of the use of Mefloquine.

The Government breached that duty of care by:

ordering the Plaintiffs, on pain of court martial, to take a drug that it knew or ought to have known was not safe and could have serious and long term adverse health effects;

ordering the Plaintiffs to take Mefloquine without conducting a proper medical screening for contraindications;

failing to provide a medication guide or other information to the Plaintiffs regarding the proper use of Mefloquine;

failing to adequately warn the Plaintiffs of the risks associated with taking Mefloquine;

failing to warn the Plaintiffs not to consume alcohol while taking Mefloquine because of the risk of adverse interactions with alcohol, including the greatly increased risk of experiencing mental problems;

failing to tell the Plaintiffs to immediately stop taking Mefloquine if they experienced any of the following symptoms: mental problems, including anxiety, depression, paranoia, hallucinations, feeling restless, confused or disoriented, unusual behavior or changes to mood; nervous system changes, including dizziness, spinning, ringing in the ears, loss of balance, seizures or convulsions; or issues with nerves, including prickling or tingling sensations, numbness and loss of an ability to feel pain or changes in temperature, a burning or sharp pain, loss of balance or co-ordination, feeling pain from a very light touch, or muscle weakness or paralysis;

ordering the Plaintiffs to continue taking Mefloquine after the above symptoms were reported;

failing to monitor or record adverse reactions and complications experienced by the Plaintiffs and other CAF Members as a result of taking Mefloquine

failing to properly investigate the side effects, adverse reactions and complications experienced by the Plaintiffs and other CAF Members as a result oftaking Mefloquine;

failing to consider and account for the risk of interaction of Mefloquine with other psychological conditions and injuries commonly experienced by CAF Members including anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury;

failing to provide and/or consider suitable alternative anti-malarial drugs to mefloquine;

requiring that the Plaintiffs take an anti-malarial drug that was unsuitable for use in a military or combat setting;

failing to provide necessary medical treatment to the Plaintiffs in a timely manner;

failing to refer the Plaintiffs to appropriate medical specialists in a timely manner, or at all;

failing to administer Mefloquine to the Plaintiffs in a safe and competent manner;

putting its own interests ahead ofthe interest of the Plaintiffs by ignoring and remaining wilfully blind to the risks of Mefloquine to individual CAF Members; and

such further and other particulars as may become apparent and counsel may advise.

As a result of the Government’s breach of its duty of care, the Plaintiffs suffered damages as set out below.

Negligent Misrepresentation

The Plaintiffs were highly dependent on information provided by the Government regarding the risks posed by Mefloquine. The Government knew that the Plaintiffs would rely on information provided by DND and CAF to the Plaintiffs in order to make decisions regarding risks to their health and safety.

DND and CAF repeatedly represented to the Plaintiffs and CAF Members as a whole that Mefloquine was safe. These representations specifically downplayed or denied the risks associated with Mefloquine and were inaccurate, incomplete, false, deceptive and/or misleading.

Canada knew or ought to have known that the representations made by CAF and DND regarding the safety of Mefloquine were inaccurate, incomplete, false, deceptive and/or misleading.

The Plaintiffs state that Canada owed a duty of care to the Plaintiffs and is liable in deceit and/or negligent misrepresentation for the Representations that were inaccurate, incomplete, false, deceptive and/or misleading and as a result of which the Plaintiffs’ suffered damages as set out below.

Breach of Fiduciary Duty

The Government owed the Plaintiffs a fiduciary duty. The relationship between the Plaintiffs and the Defendant is one of complete trust, reliance and dependency. While in the Canadian Armed Forces, the Government had extraordinary and unilateral powers over the lives of CAF Members. Because of the hierarchical and authoritarian command structure of the CAF, the binding nature of enrolment in the CAF, the oaths and declarations required by CAF Members, and the strict requirement to follow all orders of superiors, the Plaintiffs were in a position of complete vulnerability and dependence on the CAF and DND. In particular, the Plaintiffs were at the Government’ s mercy regarding what drugs they were ordered to take prior to and during deployment. Prior to and while deployed, the Government was solely responsible for the protection of the health, safety and well-being of the Plaintiffs.

The Government breached its fiduciary duties to the Plaintiffs. The particulars of the breach include:

putting its own interests ahead of the interest of the Plaintiffs by ignoring and remaining wilfully blind to the risks of Mefloquine to individual CAF Members;

ordering the Plaintiffs to take Mefloquine;

ordering the Plaintiffs to take Mefloquine without conducting a proper medical screening for contraindications;

ordering the Plaintiffs to continue taking Mefloquine after adverse symptoms were reported; and

failing to safeguard the physical and psychological health of the CAF Members.

Charter claim (breach of s.7)

I’m just going to note here that Omar Khadr claimed that the government violated his section 7 charter rights. Should the plaintiffs win this case, they could get the $5,000,000 they are asking just for this cause alone. It’s still less than half of what was paid to a confessed murderer.

The Government’ s action in forcing the Plaintiffs to take a drug that seriously impaired the Plaintiffs mental and physical health and caused severe psychological harm is an infringement of the Plaintiffs right to security of the person as enshrined in s. 7 of the Canadian Charter ofRights and Freedoms. This infringement is not justified in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice.

The breaches of the Plaintiffs’ Charter rights are not demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.

The Plaintiffs are entitled to a declaration that their Charter rights were infringed.

The Plaintiffs are also entitled to a monetary remedy pursuant to section 24(1) of the Charter in order to:

compensate the Plaintiffs for pain and suffering;

vindicate the Plaintiffs’ fundamental human rights; and

deter systematic violations of a similar nature by the Government in future.

Battery

The Plaintiffs assert that the forced ingestion of Mefloquine without their informed consent, in the circumstances pleaded above, amounts to battery.

Wilful Concealment

The Government has and continues to willfully conceal the fact that the injuries suffered by the Plaintiffs were caused by the fact that the Government ordered the Plaintiffs to take mefloquine.

Mental and psychological state

The Plaintiffs have suffered severe and debilitating mental and psychological conditions as described above as a result of taking Mefloquine and otherwise. As a result of these severe and debilitating mental and psychological conditions, the Plaintiffs were previously incapable of commencing a claim against the Defendant.

Misdiagnosis

The Plaintiffs have been misdiagnosed by doctors, including doctors employed by the government, as suffering only PTSD or Traumatic Brain Injuries, when in fact, the PlaintifTs were suffering from neurological and psychological injuries caused by mefloquine.

Stay tuned, there will be a lot more to follow.

D.B.

Exclusive: Read The Shocking Statements of Claim Here

8 vets launch actions seeking over $80 million in damages.

https://www.hshlawyers.com/blog/may-1-2019-3-mefloquine-lawsuits-filed-against-government-of-canada/

Law firm Howie, Sacks, and Henry announced today that they are launching three separate statements of claim on behalf of 8 veterans, who are seeking damages of over $10 million each.

They claim the government gave them the drug illegally and without thought for their health and safety. The blog reads in part:

… alleging that the Government, through the Department of National Defence, ordered members of the Canadian Armed Forces to take an anti-malarial medication known as “Mefloquine” without adequately informing CAF Members of the severe adverse reactions, despite warnings from the drug manufacturer.


Mefloquine is known to cause serious side effects that can persist for months or years and can become permanent.  Symptoms serious  include:
anxiety
unreasonable feeling that people are trying to harm you, do not like you, etc. (Paranoia)
depression
seeing or hearing things that are not there (hallucinations)
thought of suicide or harming yourself
feeling restless
feeling confused
unusual behavior  


Mefloquine can cause serious nervous-system problems in some people. Symptoms of serious nervous system problems include:
dizziness
a feeling that you or things around you are moving or spinning (vertigo)
loss of balance
ringing sound in your ears (tinnitus)
convulsions (seizures) in people who already have seizures (epilepsy)
unable to sleep (insomnia)


For more information on the Mefloquine Lawsuits, please visit: https://www.hshlawyers.com/expertise/mass-tort-class-action-litigation/mefloquine/, or call Paul Miller at 416-361-5990.

https://www.hshlawyers.com/blog/may-1-2019-3-mefloquine-lawsuits-filed-against-government-of-canada/

Claims and Damages.

These are some of the details of the damages being sought by each plaintiff, with each asking for over $10 million.

…general and aggravated damages arising from the Defendant’s breach of statutory and common law duties in the amount of $380,000.00;


a Declaration that the Defendant has breached the Plaintiffs’ s. 7 rights under the
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (“Charter”);
e. damages for violation of the Plaintiffs’ Charter rights pursuant to s. 24(1) of the
Charter in the amount of $5,000,000.00;


special damages in an amount to be determined, including future and anticipated
medical and out of pocket expenses;
punitive and/or exemplary damages in the amount of $5,000,000.00;


. prejudgment and post-judgment interest;
i. the costs of this action, including HST and other taxes as applicable, on a substantial
indemnity basis; and
j. such further and other relief as this Honourable Court may deem just.


The claims against the government in this case are assinine in nature, and they make me angry just having to read them. There were times when the conduct of the government appears to be criminal, but that has yet to be proven.

The details of all statements of claim are available by clicking the links below.

If you would like more information or to add your name to the list of litigants, contact Paul Miller at 416-361-5990, or visit the website at:

https://www.hshlawyers.com/expertise/mass-tort-class-action-litigation/mefloquine/

Further details as they become available.

D.B.

Dave Bona Explains The Difference Between PTSD And mefloquine Poisoning.

Knowing the symptoms.

In his latest video, Dave Bona goes over the differences between the symptoms of PTSD and mefloquine toxicity. He also gives some helpful tips and offers a message of hope for those suffering right now.

He also has an update for Canadian veterans regarding the lawsuit, and the importance of getting involved in this action. This isn’t about the money, it’s about holding the government accountable for its actions, and the more people that get involved the more likely it is that some kind of action will be taken.

Please take the time to watch this video and if you haven’t already done so follow Dave on his Facebook page.

Breaking News: Plaintiff Veterans Release Statements of Claim

8 vets launch actions seeking over $80 million in damages.

https://www.hshlawyers.com/blog/may-1-2019-3-mefloquine-lawsuits-filed-against-government-of-canada/

Law firm Howie, Sacks, and Henry announced today that they are launching three separate statements of claim on behalf of 8 veterans, who are seeking damages of over $10 million each.

They claim the government gave them the drug illegally and without thought for their health and safety. The blog reads in part:

… alleging that the Government, through the Department of National Defence, ordered members of the Canadian Armed Forces to take an anti-malarial medication known as “Mefloquine” without adequately informing CAF Members of the severe adverse reactions, despite warnings from the drug manufacturer.


Mefloquine is known to cause serious side effects that can persist for months or years and can become permanent.  Symptoms serious  include:
anxiety
unreasonable feeling that people are trying to harm you, do not like you, etc. (Paranoia)
depression
seeing or hearing things that are not there (hallucinations)
thought of suicide or harming yourself
feeling restless
feeling confused
unusual behavior  


Mefloquine can cause serious nervous-system problems in some people. Symptoms of serious nervous system problems include:
dizziness
a feeling that you or things around you are moving or spinning (vertigo)
loss of balance
ringing sound in your ears (tinnitus)
convulsions (seizures) in people who already have seizures (epilepsy)
unable to sleep (insomnia)


For more information on the Mefloquine Lawsuits, please visit: https://www.hshlawyers.com/expertise/mass-tort-class-action-litigation/mefloquine/, or call Paul Miller at 416-361-5990.

https://www.hshlawyers.com/blog/may-1-2019-3-mefloquine-lawsuits-filed-against-government-of-canada/

Claims and Damages.

These are some of the details of the damages being sought by each plaintiff, with each asking for over $10 million.

…general and aggravated damages arising from the Defendant’s breach of statutory and common law duties in the amount of $380,000.00;


a Declaration that the Defendant has breached the Plaintiffs’ s. 7 rights under the
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (“Charter”);
e. damages for violation of the Plaintiffs’ Charter rights pursuant to s. 24(1) of the
Charter in the amount of $5,000,000.00;


special damages in an amount to be determined, including future and anticipated
medical and out of pocket expenses;
punitive and/or exemplary damages in the amount of $5,000,000.00;


. prejudgment and post-judgment interest;
i. the costs of this action, including HST and other taxes as applicable, on a substantial
indemnity basis; and
j. such further and other relief as this Honourable Court may deem just.


The claims against the government in this case are assinine in nature, and they make me angry just having to read them. There were times when the conduct of the government appears to be criminal, but that has yet to be proven.

The details of all statements of claim are available by clicking the links below.

If you would like more information or to add your name to the list of litigants, contact Paul Miller at 416-361-5990, or visit the website at:

https://www.hshlawyers.com/expertise/mass-tort-class-action-litigation/mefloquine/

Further details as they become available.

D.B.

Breaking News: 8 Canadian Veterans Sue Government

“Mefloquine Cowboy” Shaun Arntsen among first plaintiffs.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/w5/canadian-veterans-suing-government-over-anti-malarial-drug-s-adverse-effects-1.4402691

A group of 8 Canadian veteran’s is taking the federal government to court for damages that occurred as a result of their being ordered to take the toxic anti-malarial medication mefloquine, also know by the brand name Lariam.

The $10 million they are asking for their ruined lives is still less than the amount convicted terrorist Omar Khadr received from the government. The government is also going to be fighting the veteran’s in court much harder than they did Khadr, so I don’t expect a settlement anytime soon. (Opinion)

These first eight will open the door to what will likely be claims by thousands more who were left with damage to their brain-stems as a result of chronic quinoline encephalopathy, or quinism. The disease is often mistakenly diagnosed as PTSD due to the similarity of symptoms and the fact that it could be concomitant with it. Specialized screening and testing is necessary to diagnose it.

In a surprise video posted to his Facebook page tonight veteran and quinism advocate Shaun Arntsen announced that he is one of the first eight. For Arntsen and his fellow plaintiffs, this isn’t just about being compensated for their lifelong injuries, this is about holding the government to account. This is about the government doing the right thing.

More to follow…